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2016 PURE AWARDS


Physician preference: Supply Chain matters for patient, industry health


Four MDs shatter professional stereotypes about attitudes, motives and business relationships by Rick Dana Barlow


ack in 2005, Healthcare Purchasing News launched an annual award that recognized and honored healthcare organization CEOs and presidents who Support, Understand, Recognize and Em- power Supply Chain Management. They are S.U.R.E. about the importance of supply chain operations to the health and well- being of an organization and the quality of patient care it delivers. Starting this year HPN decided to launch a brand extension to honor those profes- sionals a bit closer to supply chain manage- ment activities — physicians. Why? We’re witnessing more doctors and surgeons par- ticipating in supply chain operations with


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more depth than ever before so we want to share their ongoing stories with the industry. Our goal with this inaugural award is twofold: We want to rec- ognize physicians who have made solid contributions to supply chain operations — activities, practices and thinking — and we want to further solidify and strengthen the clinical bonds between physicians and supply chain professionals. We selected four to profile and receive the first annual Physicians Understanding, Respecting and Engaging Supply Chain profes- sionals or “P.U.R.E.” award to enhance their clinical practices and the patient care they deliver. HPN’s 2016 Supply Chain-Focused physicians are:


• Li Ern Chen, MD, MSCS, Vice President, Surgery, Baylor Scott & White Health, Dallas


• Jimmy Chung, MD, FACS, CHCQM, Director, Medical Products Analysis, Providence Health & Services, Seattle


• Sean Lyden, MD, FACS, Professor and Chairman, Department of Vascular Surgery, and Medical Director of Supply Chain, Cleveland Clinic, and Chief Medical Officer, Excelerate Strategic Health Sourcing, Lyndhurst, OH


• David Reiter, MD, MBA, FACS, Vice President and Executive Director, Center for Healthcare Entrepreneurship & Scientific So- lutions, and Professor (Otolaryngology - Facial Plastic Surgery), Sidney Kimmel Medical College, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia. HPN’s wide-ranging interview explored how all four emerged


as a supply chain champion and share like-minded, unselfish pas- sion about the people, processes and products that impact patient outcomes and operational stability.


HPN: Are you surprised that it’s taken so long for doctors to become more directly involved in supply chain issues? Why?


10 July 2016 • HEALTHCARE PURCHASING NEWS • hpnonline.com


Li Ern Chen, MD MSCS, Vice President, Sur- gery, Baylor Scott & White Health, Dallas


Traditionally, physicians are not schooled in supply chain activities. As the end user, physicians have largely been able to use the products of their choice, and therefore have not personally felt the need to engage with the supply chain. However, in this era of cost con- tainment, it is only natural that physi- cians are now increasingly involved in supply chain activities.


Jimmy Chung, MD, FACS, CHCQM, Direc- tor, Medical Products Analysis, Providence Health & Services, Seattle


I’m not surprised at all. Physicians have historically been shielded from business decisions at hospitals where administrators have bent over backwards to give them what they want and “let them do what they do best.” Most medical schools don’t teach the business of healthcare, which has always been portrayed as be- ing “beneath” doctors. Now that doctors are feeling the squeeze personally with bundled payments and value-based care, they are becoming more interested.


Sean Lyden, MD, FACS, Professor and Chairman, Department of Vascular Surgery, and Medical Director of Supply Chain, Cleveland Clinic, and Chief Medical Officer, Excelerate Strategic Health Sourc- ing, Lyndhurst, OH


No. Many physicians are unaware of how devices get into the hospital until it affects them directly. I have found that physicians just assume it all happens without much effort. Once physicians become aware of the process and that their involvement is critical, they become very engaged.


David Reiter, MD, MBA, FACS, Vice President and Executive Director, Center for Healthcare Entrepreneurship & Scientific Solutions, and Professor (Otolaryngology - Facial Plastic Surgery), Sidney Kimmel Medical College, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia


No. Physicians have historically approached equipment and sup- plies as necessities and entitlements to be provided in accord with their personal preferences and beliefs. Timely availability at the point of care was the sole consideration. How, from where and at what cost they got there were not relevant.


How — and when — did you decide to get involved with supply chain issues?


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