search.noResults

search.searching

note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
2016 PURE AWARDS


REITER: For the former: “So you can never adopt advances in care because you weren’t taught to use them in med school or residency? Will you abandon that procedure when the product in question is no longer available?” And for the latter: “If that’s the strength of your association with our organization, perhaps you should do so anyway. A relationship so fragile that one product substitution would break it is not much of a relationship.”


Please visit us at AHRMM 2016 in booth #1022 Linked-in: www.linkedin.com/company/1202455


16 July 2016 • HEALTHCARE PURCHASING NEWS • hpnonline.com


Will you describe some of the challenges that physicians have in working with Supply Chain? CHEN: Since physicians have not been to “Sup- ply Chain School,” they will need to gain a fundamental understanding of the structure and functions of supply chain. A recognition of the value of the clinical perspective will allow physicians to be embraced much more quickly by Supply Chain. Clinicians and the Supply Chain have different data needs, and develop- ment of a strong partnership is necessary so that data collected is meaningful clinically and financially. CHUNG: There is no formal education that physicians can receive in supply chain, so it takes a long time to really get a good under- standing of what is happening. Many physi- cians are too proud to admit that they might not understand something that is healthcare- related when they have already reached the top of their own profession. The other problem is that there is no defined career path in supply chain for physicians. Suppose a physician gets a job as an advisor or medical director for sup- ply chain. Where would they go from there? No one knows, because no one has done this yet. LYDEN: Getting physicians to the table, get- ting them involved, helping them to understand that tough choices need to be made to keep hospitals viable. REITER: Supply Chain staff and management are often perceived as being totally disinterested in outcomes and unconcerned with physician needs. A growing number of Supply Chain Management people are empowered by senior management to take a more active role in product selection. The attitude that “we have to do it — to cut costs — because you won’t” is an immediate turnoff. Supply Chain person- nel who are truly and demonstrably interested in how they can improve care are engaging. If they present themselves to the medical staff as colleagues respectful of the docs’ time and knowledge while offering complementary knowledge, skill and experience, they become an integral part of the team. HPN


Editor’s Note: To learn how all four P.U.R.E. win- ners forecast Supply Chain teaming up with physi- cians in the future — including physicians in Supply Chain leadership and staff positions — read the full interview at www.hpnonline.com/inside/2016- 07/1607-SF-PURE.html.


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64